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Woman’s Period Cramps Vs. Man’s Kicked in The Balls

Dec 18, 2021

A lot more than period pains; getting kicked in the balls is a bad thing. While a shot in the nuts can last for hours or days, periods can last up to a week. The pain from getting hit in the balls isn’t as severe and occurs as often as periods. The feeling of choking that a man gets from being kicked in the balls makes it difficult to breathe. This feeling is temporary and only occurs if you have done something that was not right. A girl will still have her period every month, regardles ...read more

How Many Axolotls Are Left In The World?

Dec 18, 2021

The axolotl, with the name Ambystoma mexicanum, is a paedomorphic salamander closely related to the tiger salamander. The species was first found in many lakes, including Lake Xochimilco, underlying Mexico City. Axolotls, which are amphibians, reach adulthood without going through a metamorphosis. It is a rare species among amphibians. Adults stay in the water and are gilled instead of moving to land. Axolotls can grow up to 15-45cm in length and weigh between 50 and 250g. They live betwe ...read more

Could free school lunches have lifelong health benefits? Why don't kids get as sick as adults from the coronavirus? Find out in ScienceSeeker's picks of the best posts for the week of August 30 - September 5 2021 #SciSeekPicks #SciComm.

Dec 18, 2021

In this week's bitesize edition of the best of science news from around the world, discover how researchers could be using your Facebook data for scientific research, and discover the sweet secrets of beetroot and what the link is between it and the smell of rain on a dry surface. ScienceSeeker editors' favourite posts within their respective areas of interest and expertise also cover many other important and exciting topics. Why not have a read, inform yourself, and indulge your scientific curi ...read more

Why does gravity pull us down and not up?

Dec 18, 2021

Mario Borunda, Oklahoma State University Curious Kids is a series for children of all ages. If you have a question you’d like an expert to answer, send it to curiouskidsus@theconversation.com. Why does gravity pull us down and not up? – Gracie, age 9, Brookline, Massachusetts Gravity is the reason things with mass or energy are attracted to each other. It is why apples fall toward the ground and planets orbit stars. Magnets attract some types of metals, but they can al ...read more

How to open iRCTC account?

Dec 18, 2021

If you want to travel in India with Indian Railways then you need to have IRCTC account to book train tickets. Please follow the following steps to create your IRCTC account online. Go to https://www.irctc.co.in/nget/profile/user-registration Registration page should look like above image. 2. In order to create you IRCTC account you need to fill the registration form and enter basic, personal and address details. Before opening account please make sure you have a valid email Id and ...read more

Astronomers See a Star Crash Through the Planetary Disk of Another Star

Dec 18, 2021

What causes an otherwise unremarkable star to become over 100 times brighter? That’s a question astronomers have been pondering since 1936, when a star in Orion brightened from 16th magnitude to 8th magnitude in a single year. The star, named FU Ori, is still bright to this day. Astronomers have come up with different explanations for the star’s brightening, but none of them provides a complete explanation. Now we might have one. A new study titled “On the rise times in FU Orionis event ...read more

Curious Kids: Why are the northern lights only spotted near the North Pole?

Dec 18, 2021

Samantha Lawler, University of Regina Curious Kids is a series for children of all ages. Have a question you’d like an expert to answer? Send it to CuriousKidsCanada@theconversation.com. Why are the northern lights only spotted at areas around the poles? — Naba, 9, Oakville, Ont. The northern lights are also called auroras, and they are regularly visible near Earth’s North and South Poles. They are a direct connection between the Earth and what’s happening on the sun. Did ...read more

The Discovery Of Room Temperature Superconductors

Dec 18, 2021

The discovery of room-temperature superconductor materials has given scientists new hope in the field of science. The advancement in this area has helped to reduce bandwidth and energy consumption, which is one of the reasons why so many people are excited about these discoveries. Room temperature superconducting materials are made up of metal alloys that may be difficult to work with to create this material that physicists call “perfect plasma”. Devices that use vacuum tubes to gener ...read more

Astronomy Jargon 101: Escape Velocity

Dec 18, 2021

In this series we are exploring the weird and wonderful world of astronomy jargon! You’ll finally get away with today’s topic: escape velocity! If you really want to get away for a vacation, you’re gonna have to work for it. Getting into space isn’t all that hard. Staying in space in a whole different ballgame. Never coming back to Earth takes some real firepower. The problem is that gravity, while weak, is persistent. You can get as far away from the Earth as you want, but the Earth ...read more

The Importance and Role of the Nucleus in Cell Division

Dec 18, 2021

If a fertilized egg is deprived of its nucleus it fails to develop properly; in fact the enucleated egg usually dies unless the nucleus is returned within a short period of time. This in itself shows that the nucleus plays an important part in cell division and in directing the development of the fertilized egg into an embryo. The nucleus is, of course, required for cell division, but it also determines the type of structure which the cell eventually develops into. This has been demonstrated ...read more

See a moon forming, and find out why pandemics come in waves in ScienceSeeker's picks of the best posts for the week of August 2-8 2021 #SciSeekPicks #SciComm.

Dec 18, 2021

In this week's edition of the best and brightest from science news around the world, discover bacteria that can chomp through metal and plastic, and how volcanic eruptions are set to cause chaos. ScienceSeeker editors' favourite posts within their respective areas of interest and expertise also cover many other important and exciting topics. Why not have a read, inform yourself, and indulge your scientific curiosity?Come See Astronomy’s Most Important Moon-Forming Image Ever by Ethan Sieg ...read more

What are the Chances of a Zombie Apocalypse?

Dec 18, 2021

Zombies, or the undead, attack the living, and they often go in packs. They are known to lead brains to live. The movie madness about zombies has brought conspiracies that humans will turn into zombies one day, and a zombie apocalypse is just around the corner. How true is this, though? Is there really a chance for a zombie apocalypse? A Virus Starts it All Humans turn into zombies because of a specific virus that spreads easily. It is said that the zombie virus is transmitted through ...read more

Curious kids: why do sloths go slow?

Dec 18, 2021

Shelby A. Ryan, University of Newcastle y Ryan R. Witt, University of Newcastle Why do sloths go slow? Nina, Sydney, aged 5 You’re right, sloths do move very slowly! Sloths live in tropical forests in South and Central America, and they actually move so slowly that algae grows on their fur. This can give sloths a green colour that helps them hide in the forest from predators like nocturnal cats and harpy eagles. This is very lucky, because some sloths often move less than 40 me ...read more

What’s Inside a Kangaroo Pouch? Get to Know Everything Here!

Dec 18, 2021

Kangaroos are one of the fascinating marsupials in the world, and a huge part of this is because of their pouch where they carry their little ones, also referred to as “joeys.” Other animals have pouches, too, though, such as the koala, wombat, wallaby, and opossum. But in this post, we will talk about a kangaroo’s pouch. Kangaroos have a special pouch called “marsupium” that they use to carry their babies due to their tiny size when born. In fact, the joeys are so tiny that the ...read more

Could the Olympics be an evolutionary event for the coronavirus? How did the Delta variant come about? Find out in ScienceSeeker's picks of the best posts for the week of July 19 - July 25 2021 #SciSeekPicks #SciComm.

Dec 18, 2021

In this week's edition of the best and brightest from science news around the world, explore how the film Tenet addresses entropy and Maxwell's demon, and find out how two cups of coffee could reduce the risk of renal cancer. ScienceSeeker editors' favourite posts within their respective areas of interest and expertise also cover many other important and exciting topics. Why not have a read, inform yourself, and indulge your scientific curiosity?The Olympics could be a Covid-19 ‘super-evolutio ...read more